i literall;yt canot deal w this rn alksdfn

i literall;yt canot deal w this rn alksdfn

(Source: undercaptivate)

heartycas:

rad ladies gettin’ down 

heartycas:

rad ladies gettin’ down 

(Source: pornazzi)

(Source: holyfuuu)

ghdos:

This is the dopest thing I’ve seen all day.

ghdos:

This is the dopest thing I’ve seen all day.

dirtyberd:

Wow gee how nice of him to go down on her for 15 seconds 😒

lmfao

cavetocanvas:

William Copley, Untitled Blue Couple, 1974

A self-taught painter, onetime gallery owner, collector and patron, William N. Copley (who adopted the moniker „CPLY‟) occupied a singular place in the post-war American art scene. Having already run a gallery specialising in Surrealist art, he took up painting in the late 1940s and spent a decade in Paris where he mixed in Surrealist circles. After moving to New York in the mid 1960s, he began depicting everyday American scenes and emblems of popular culture, from cowboys to pin-up girls, in a distinctive comic book style. 
Painted between 1972 and 1974, the „X-Rated‟ canvases present single figures, couples and threesomes in various states of sexual abandon. Copley based his imagery on pornographic magazines he had bought from 42nd Street (as he recalled, at “one of those really crummy joints”), as well as art reproductions and adverts. Sprawling, cavorting figures are conveyed using bold lines and arcs and simple expanses of blotched flesh tone. In a nod to Surrealist disjunctions, many of the paintings are incongruously named after Hollywood films.
Pursuing figuration at a time when abstraction and minimalism were in the ascendant, „X-Rated‟ was largely overlooked at the time. It is now considered a seminal moment in Copley‟s career, standing at the crux between European Dada and Surrealism and American Pop Art. Copley‟s cartoonish aesthetic closely anticipates the works of Warhol, Lichtenstein et al, at the same time as echoing the curvaceous and colour-saturated nudes of the School of Paris. As the artist and writer Anne Doran observes: 
“CPLY‟s art took Dada‟s irreverence, Surrealist eroticism and visual punning, and the colors and patterns of Matisse at his most decorative, and combined them with a thoroughly American sense of humour.” (via)

cavetocanvas:

William Copley, Untitled Blue Couple, 1974

A self-taught painter, onetime gallery owner, collector and patron, William N. Copley (who adopted the moniker „CPLY‟) occupied a singular place in the post-war American art scene. Having already run a gallery specialising in Surrealist art, he took up painting in the late 1940s and spent a decade in Paris where he mixed in Surrealist circles. After moving to New York in the mid 1960s, he began depicting everyday American scenes and emblems of popular culture, from cowboys to pin-up girls, in a distinctive comic book style. 

Painted between 1972 and 1974, the „X-Rated‟ canvases present single figures, couples and threesomes in various states of sexual abandon. Copley based his imagery on pornographic magazines he had bought from 42nd Street (as he recalled, at “one of those really crummy joints”), as well as art reproductions and adverts. Sprawling, cavorting figures are conveyed using bold lines and arcs and simple expanses of blotched flesh tone. In a nod to Surrealist disjunctions, many of the paintings are incongruously named after Hollywood films.

Pursuing figuration at a time when abstraction and minimalism were in the ascendant, „X-Rated‟ was largely overlooked at the time. It is now considered a seminal moment in Copley‟s career, standing at the crux between European Dada and Surrealism and American Pop Art. Copley‟s cartoonish aesthetic closely anticipates the works of Warhol, Lichtenstein et al, at the same time as echoing the curvaceous and colour-saturated nudes of the School of Paris. As the artist and writer Anne Doran observes: 

“CPLY‟s art took Dada‟s irreverence, Surrealist eroticism and visual punning, and the colors and patterns of Matisse at his most decorative, and combined them with a thoroughly American sense of humour.” (via)

lmao

lmao

(Source: nerdsfuckhard)